Rare Medical News

Disease Profile

Trigeminal trophic syndrome

Prevalence
Prevalence estimates on Rare Medical Network websites are calculated based on data available from numerous sources, including US and European government statistics, the NIH, Orphanet, and published epidemiologic studies. Rare disease population data is recognized to be highly variable, and based on a wide variety of source data and methodologies, so the prevalence data on this site should be assumed to be estimated and cannot be considered to be absolutely correct.

Unknown

Age of onset

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ICD-10

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Inheritance

Autosomal dominant A pathogenic variant in only one gene copy in each cell is sufficient to cause an autosomal dominant disease

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Autosomal recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of each gene of the chromosome are needed to cause an autosomal recessive disease and observe the mutant phenotype

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X-linked
dominant X-linked dominant inheritance, sometimes referred to as X-linked dominance, is a mode of genetic inheritance by which a dominant gene is carried on the X chromosome.

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X-linked
recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of a gene on the X chromosome cause an X-linked recessive disorder

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Mitochondrial or multigenic Mitochondrial genetic disorders can be caused by changes (mutations) in either the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that lead to dysfunction of the mitochondria and inadequate production of energy.

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Multigenic or multifactor Inheritance involving many factors, of which at least one is genetic but none is of overwhelming importance, as in the causation of a disease by multiple genetic and environmental factors.

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Not applicable

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Summary

Trigeminal trophic syndrome is a rare disease that affects the skin on the side of the nose, supplied by the trigeminal nerve. People with trigeminal trophic syndrome have a loss of sensation in the nose or abnormal sensations like tingling, numbness, or burning and they rub or scratch the skin causing cuts or ulcers in the area. When the cuts heal, they can cause scars that pull up the lip. Similar cuts may also occur in the corners of the eyes, scalp or inside the mouth. The tip of the nose is spared because its sensation comes from a different nerve. Trigeminal trophic syndrome may occur in people who were treated for trigeminal neuralgia or after leprosy (Hansen's disease) or shingles infection. Treatment options include medications, radiotherapy, and covering the wounds until they have fully healed. Another treatment option is a technique called transcutaneous electrical stimulation that uses a small electronic device to direct mild electric pulses to nerve endings that lie beneath the skin.[1][2]

References

  1. Amerasinghe N. Trigeminal trophic syndrome.. DermNet NZ. December 29, 2013; https://www.dermnetnz.org/site-age-specific/trigeminal-trophic-syndrome.html. Accessed 12/3/2015.
  2. Dolohanty LB, Richardson SJ, Herrmann DN, Markman J & Mercurio MG. Trigeminal trophic syndrome with histopathologic correlation. Cutis. March, 2015; 95(3):E22-5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25844791. Accessed 12/3/2015.