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Short bowel syndrome

Short-bowel syndrome is a disorder clinically defined by malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, fluid and electrolyte disturbances, and malnutrition.

Prevalence

<1 / 1 000 000

< 331

US Estimated

<1 / 1 000 000

< 514

Europe Estimated

Age of Onset

ageofonset-infancy.svg

ICD-10

D81.8

Inheritance

Autosomal dominant

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Autosomal recessive

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Mitochondrial/Multigenic

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X-linked dominant

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X-linked recessive

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5 Facts you should know

FACT

1

Short bowel syndrome (SBS, or simply short gut) is a malabsorption disorder caused by a lack of functional small intestine.

FACT

2

Most cases are due to the surgical removal of a large portion of the small intestine.

FACT

3

In children the main causes include necrotizing enterocolitis, intestinal atresias, and intestinal volvulus.

FACT

4

Various nonoperative procedures, such as radiation enteritis, can leave patients with a functional short-bowel syndrome.

FACT

5

Disease, traumatic injury, vascular accident, or other pathology that leaves less than 200 cm of viable small bowel or results in a loss of 50% or more of the small intestine places the patient at risk for developing short-bowel syndrome.

Short bowel syndrome

Activated PI3K Delta Syndrome

Gastroschisis, SBS, Short Gut Syndrome

What’s your rare IQ?

Which of the following is the most common symptom of short bowel syndrome?

Common Signs & Symptoms

Bronchiectasis

Permanent enlargement of the airways of the lungs

Decreased circulating IgG2 level

Decreased proportion of class-switched memory B cells

Decreased specific pneumococcal antibody level

Increased circulating IgM level

Increased proportion of transitional B cells

Lymphadenopathy

Swollen lymph nodes

Recurrent ear infections

Frequent ear infections

Top clinical studies

TitleDescriptionPhasesStatusInterventionsLocationsMore Information
VIBRANT Study of Vurolenatide in Adult Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome. A Phase 2 study of Vurolenatide in adult patients with SBS. A total of 22 patients are planned to be dosed in four treatment groups with placebo and/or active Vurolenatide. The study is 13 weeks (3 weeks screening, 4 weeks SC study drug administration, and 6 weeks of follow up). Safety and efficacy will be analyzed. Information on patients reported outcomes (ePRO) will be collected.Phase 2RecruitingDrug: Vurolenatide 50mg/PBO|Drug: Vurolenatide 100mg/PBO|Drug: Vurolenatide 50/50 mg|Drug: PlaceboResearch Site, Nashville, Tennessee, United StatesMore Information
Proof of Concept Study in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome This is a Phase I/II. proof of concept, open label, two-dose, dose escalation study of NM-002 in adult patients with SBS who previously responded to exenatide. NM-002 is planned to be administered twice, at up to 3 different dose levels, in up to 3 cohorts, each consisting of 3-4 patients. Doses will be administered on Days 1 and 15 by subcutaneous injection. Patients will be monitored for their usage of parenteral supplementation, and will fill out a daily diary for their symptoms of SBS. Urine output will be measured on a daily basis. Patients will be followed for 6 weeks after the second dose.Phase 1|Phase 2Active, not recruitingDrug: NM-002Research Facility One, Los Angeles, California, United StatesMore Information
Functional Sucrase Deficiency in Short Bowel Syndrome Patients With Intestinal Failure Short gut syndrome with intestinal failure patients may have decreased production of disaccharidases, like sucrase, an enzyme responsible for digesting sugar in foods. This can happen due to loss of bowel length from surgery or from loss of cellular function in the intestines due to use of parenteral nutrition intravenously. Therefore, patients with these conditions may not be able to digest sucrose (sugar) fully. Patients might experience abdominal distension/pain, vomiting and diarrhea when sugar is taken in orally or through the g-tube, which can limit patients' ability to increase oral or g-tube feeds in short gut syndrome patients with intestinal failure.

In patients with short gut syndrome and intestinal failure, the administration of exogenous sucrase (enzyme) may improve sucrose (sugar) digestion and thus the ability to tolerate more oral or g-tube feeds.
Phase 2Not yet recruitingDrug: Sucrase|Other: PlaceboJackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida, United States|University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United StatesMore Information
Trial to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Apraglutide in SBS-IF The primary objective of the trial is the confirmation of the efficacy of apraglutide to evaluate the efficacy of weekly subcutaneous apraglutide in reducing parenteral support dependency.
Phase 3RecruitingDrug: apraglutideRonald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, United States|Gastroenterology Group of Naples, Naples, Florida, United States|University of Illinois, Outpatient Care Center, Chicago, Illinois, United States|Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States|Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States|Henry Ford Medical Center - Columbus, Novi, Michigan, United States|Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States|University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States|Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, United States|Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, United States|Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, United States|Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Center for Human Nutrition, Nashville, Tennessee, United States|Universitair Ziekenhuis Leuven - Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Vlaams Brabant, Belgium|Hospital Novy Jicin, Nový Jičín, Czechia|University Hospital Plzen, Pilsen, Czechia|Fakultní nemocnice Královské Vinohrady, II. Interní klinika, Prague, Czechia|Thomayer University Hospital, Prague, Czechia|CHU de Caen Normandie, Caen, France|Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, France|CHU Hôtel Dieu, Nantes, France|Hôpital ARCHET II, Nice, France|Hôpital Haut-Lévèque, Pessac, France|Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pierre Benite, France|Rennes University Hospital Center - Hospital Pontchaillou, Rennes, France|Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany|Asklepios Klinik St. Georg, Hamburg, Germany|University Hospital Muenster, Münster, Germany|Polyclinic S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy|Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan|Yokohama Municipal Citizen's Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan|Yokohama City University Medical Center, Kanagawa, Japan|National University Corportation Tohoku University Tohoku University Hospital, Miyagi, Japan|Osaka University Hospital, Osaka, Japan|Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu, Korea, Republic of|The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, Korea, Republic of|Asan Medical Center, Soeul, Korea, Republic of|Samsung Medical Center, Soeul, Korea, Republic of|Stadmedica, Non-Public Healthcare Facility, Bydgoszcz, Poland|COPERNICUS Limited Liability Company, Gdansk, Poland|Gastromed Poland Sp. z o.o., Lublin, Poland|SOLUMED Medical Center, Poznań, Poland|Stanley Dudrick Multispecialty Hospital, Skawina, Poland|M. Pirogow Provincial Specialized Hospital, Łódź, Poland|Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan|China Medical University Hospital (CMUH), Taichung, Taiwan|Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, TaiwanMore Information
Evaluation of Long Term Safety and Efficacy of Glepaglutide in Treatment of SBS The primary objective of the trial is to evaluate the long-term safety of glepaglutide treatment in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS).

Glepaglutide is the International Nonproprietary Name and USAN for ZP1848.
Phase 3RecruitingDrug: glepaglutideMayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona, United States|Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia, United States|Miami Transplant Institute, Miami, Florida, United States|Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Chicago, Illinois, United States|University of Chicago Children's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, United States|University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States|Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, United States|University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States|Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York, United States|Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States|Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Nashville, Tennessee, United States|Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, United States|Hôpital Erasme, Bruxelles, Belgium|UZ Leuven, Leuven, Belgium|The Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Canada|Western University, London, Canada|University Health Network - Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Canada|Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark|Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, France|CHRU de Lille, Lille, France|CHRU Nancy, Nancy, France|Hôpital de l'Archet, Nice, France|Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Pierre-Bénite, France|Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany|Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Bonn, Germany|Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt - Med. Klinik I, Frankfurt, Germany|Asklepios Kliniken Hamburg GmbH, Hamburg, Germany|Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Rostock, Germany|Universitätsklinikum Tübingen - Innere Medizin I, Tübingen, Germany|Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Bologna, Italy|Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Federico II, Napoli, Italy|UMC Radboud Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands|Solumed, Poznań, Poland|Szpital Skawina sp. z o.o. im. Stanley Dudricka, Skawina, Poland|Wojewodzki Specjalistyczny Szpital im. M. Pirogowa w Lodzi, Łódź, Poland|St Mark's Hospital, Harrow, United Kingdom|UCLH Foundation NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom|Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom|University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom|University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United KingdomMore Information
Efficacy And Safety Evaluation of Glepaglutide in Treatment of SBS The primary objective of the trial is to confirm the efficacy of glepaglutide in reducing parenteral support volume in patients with short bowel syndrome.

Glepaglutide is the International Nonproprietary Name and USAN for ZP1848.
Phase 3RecruitingDrug: glepaglutide|Drug: PlaceboMayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona, United States|Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia, United States|Miami Transplant Institute, Miami, Florida, United States|Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Chicago, Illinois, United States|University of Chicago Children's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, United States|University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States|Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, United States|University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States|Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York, United States|Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States|Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Nashville, Tennessee, United States|Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, United States|Hôpital Erasme, Bruxelles, Belgium|UZ Leuven, Leuven, Belgium|The Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Canada|Western University, London, Canada|University Health Network - Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Canada|Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark|Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark|Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, France|CHRU de Lille, Lille, France|CHRU Nancy, Nancy, France|Hôpital de l'Archet, Nice, France|Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Pierre-Bénite, France|Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany|Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Bonn, Germany|Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt - Med. Klinik I, Frankfurt, Germany|Asklepios Kliniken Hamburg GmbH, Hamburg, Germany|Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Rostock, Germany|Universitätsklinikum Tübingen - Innere Medizin I, Tübingen, Germany|Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Bologna, Italy|Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Federico II, Napoli, Italy|UMC Radboud Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands|Solumed, Poznań, Poland|Szpital Skawina sp. z o.o. im. Stanley Dudricka, Skawina, Poland|Wojewodzki Specjalistyczny Szpital im. M. Pirogowa w Lodzi, Łódź, Poland|St Mark's Hospital, Harrow, United Kingdom|UCLH Foundation NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom|Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom|University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom|University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United KingdomMore Information

Top treatments in development

AgentClass/Mechanism of ActionDevelopment StatusCompanyCompany ContactClinical StudiesMore Information
VurolenatideLong-acting injectable GLP-1 analogue, vurolenatide is designed specifically to slow digestive transit, thereby mitigating the SBS hallmark of excessive gastric motility due to deficient GLP-1 in the shortened intestine. This mechanism is intended to improve intestinal absorption of nutrients and water and reduce diarrhea for all patients with any type of post surgical SBS, regardless of their parenteral support requirements. Owing to its extended half-life, vurolenatide only needs to be dosed twice monthly at most, thus considerably improving convenience for patients and their caregivers.Phase 29 Meters Biopharma, Inc.Mary E Layton 919-275-1933 SBS1002@9meters.com
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=&term=Vurolenatide&cntry=&state=&city=&dist=More Information
ApraglutideA next-generation, long-acting, synthetic GLP-2 analog that acts as a selective, full agonist of the GLP 2 receptor.Phase 3VectivBio AGFritze 41615513030 clinicaltrials@vectivbio.com
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=&term=apraglutide&cntry=&state=&city=&dist=More Information
GlepaglutideGlepaglutide is a long-acting GLP-2 analog in development for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS).Phase 3Zealand Pharma Medical Director +4588773600 mag@zealandpharma.com
Senior Clinical Trial Manager +4588773600 teg@zealandpharma.com
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=&term=glepaglutide&cntry=&state=&city=&dist=More Information